Baseball History: Interviewing Babe Ruth

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “The Interview.”

If there is one baseball player from the old days I would give just about anything to interview, it’d be one of the most respected baseball players of all time, Babe Ruth. The hall of famer totaled over 700 home runs, and sat at the top of the all-time home run list until Hank Aaron broke his record in 1974.

Ruth played back in the days where pitchers could easily go nine innings, and still throw their best stuff late in the game. Some would argue that the Babe’s career — especially his 1919 season when he hit 29 home runs — signaled the end of the “dead ball era.”

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Baseball History: National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

While up in New York for baseball, you have to consider a weekend getaway to the village of Cooperstown. Nestled between the Adirondacks and Catskill mountains, Cooperstown is simply put where baseball lives.

If Yankee Stadium is “the Cathedral” to baseball, then Cooperstown is baseball heaven. Home to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Cooperstown is all about baseball. The entire village survives on baseball business. From the souvenir shops on Main Street to the restaurants, they all make a living based off the museum which sits at 25 Main Street.

Where all the greats are enshrined, the Hall of Fame plaque gallery (shown below) is stunning. The museum catalogs the history of the game from start to present day. If you want to really experience baseball ecstasy, consider visiting over the annual induction weekend, which usually takes place the last weekend in July. During the weekend-long celebration, the new inductees are enshrined in the Hall of Fame and give their induction speeches in front of thousands of die-hard fans. I had the pleasure of being in attendance to see Tom Glavine, Greg Maddux, Bobby Cox, Joe Torre and Tony LaRussa get inducted in July 2014. It’s an experience unlike any other.

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The plaque gallery at the Hall of Fame (image credit: Andrew Kivette)

 

Baseball History: Monument Park

In my post on Yankee Stadium (which you can read here), I discussed the tradition and history of the Yankees franchise, which you can delve into in Monument Park. Located beyond the fences in center field, Monument Park memorializes great Yankee players. It also has several monuments to significant moments in history, as well. Tucked into a corner of Monument Park is this reminder of the terrorist attacks that occurred in New York on September 11, 2001.

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Image credit: Andrew Kivette

It serves as a great reminder to the victims of the attack. The inscription reads:

“We Remember
On September 11, 2001, despicable acts of terrorism were perpetrated on our country. In tribute to the eternal spirit of the innocent victims of these crimes and to the selfless courage shown by both public servants and private citizens, we dedicate this plaque. These valiant souls, with unfettered resolve, exemplify the true character of this great nation. Their unity and resilience during this time of distress defined American heroism for future generations.

Dedicated by the New York Yankees
September 11, 2002”

Baseball History: Kenesaw Mountain Landis

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Image credit: Andrew Kivette

If you find some downtime while in Atlanta, take a day trip up I-75 to Kennesaw, and the historic Kennesaw Mountain battlefield. Located about 30 miles north of Turner Field in downtown Atlanta, Kennesaw is the namesake of baseball’s first commissioner, Kenesaw Mountain Landis. He got his name from the battle of Kennesaw Mountain in the Civil War, where his father was seriously injured while fighting for the North.

Landis is in the hall of fame, as he was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum via a special election after his death in 1944.

During his reign as commissioner, Landis oversaw the scandal of the “Black Sox” and most notably banned Joe “Shoeless” Jackson from playing in the majors following the scandal. The photo to the left is a picture of his hall of fame plaque in Cooperstown, N.Y.

For more information on the first commissioner, check out his bios on Major League Baseball’s site or at the Hall of Fame.